Talking About Meh Generation

Meh

 

Nothing impresses us anymore. We’re all Meh this and Meh that.

In my efforts to understand Meh, I reached for the Google. I found two main definitions I could relate to (now it being the Google and all I am sure there are many more conflicting definitions, but this is what we got).

Meh:

  • exclamation: expressing a lack of interest or enthusiasm
  • adjective: uninspiring; unexceptional

One definition places it as an attitude coming from the user about something. The other places the quality of Mehness in the object. To me they are really different meanings that seem similar.

I think it’s a cheap shot to place Mehness madness at the foot of the object. It’s not the generator of the response. As Hamlet likes to say, nothing is good or bad but our thinking makes it so. So it’s us.

And that worries me: expressing a lack of enthusiasm. That can’t be good. I feel I’m surrounded by Meh: a world of Mehers.

We have such a pervasive attitude of Mehness that in order to get our attention makers of almost everything resort to more and more obnoxiousness. Subtlety be damned. If I can’t override your Mehness in the first couple minutes, I’ve lost you. Our propensity for Mehness just bowls everything thing over. We’re on Meh autopilot. Everything is Meh, no reason to stop here. It’s all Meh.

Mehness is like a weed and it’s overgrown the roses on the side of the road we are supposed to stop and smell.

But everything isn’t Meh. The world is filled with intricacies and elaborate delicacies that deserve a little time and are certainly not Meh. True wonders are out there if savored.

We have only ourselves to blame for extreme everything. Things can’t survive if we don’t give our passion to them.

My God, have the balls to care for something. Let people know. Give obnoxious extremism a run for its money.

Are we afraid to show passion for something? I thought the Nerd Revolution (you know, the revolution where it was OK to be really into obscure nerdy things without being mocked) might have given Meh a run for its money.

Fight the Meh Borg. Show passion for something today. It’s worth it. Trust me.

 

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About joegergen

To evoke a smile. That's all. Author of "Methane Wars: A Fable" and "Lear's Fool" as well as various poems and some these painting things as well.
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10 Responses to Talking About Meh Generation

  1. Mehness is indeed like a weed. Hope you have a great “non-meh” new year

  2. We are indeed- When I was in high school I remember talking with my friends about how we would be remembered as the generation without a generation.

  3. mini.R says:

    This is really interesting! I’ve never thought properly about this, but it’s so true. I like how there was nothing left to say about the subject; and that Hamlet quote was spot on! Thanks for following and sharing the link, I loved reading it 🙂

  4. Such a great post. The inertia of being observers rather than doers and be-ers is maybe partly to blame. So many people seem to have just given up. The culture of armchair critics may intimidate some, but it actually feels good to annoy people with over-the-top enthusiasm. Maybe a little dancing would be a good place to start. Let’s get out of Meh City and move our lazy butts.
    Julie

  5. joegergen says:

    Yes Julie. Let’s get out of Meh City for sure. That’s something I can get exited about.

  6. Love this! The pronunciation of Meh so repeated, along with your point (which is true), almost sounds in contemporary English like someone vomiting Saharas of boredom over their own solipsism or narcissistic self-implosion. It’s both funny and sad, your essay, the phenomenon, and our “culture”. Thank you!

  7. Pingback: Finding an “Ism” that I can Live For | Fortress of Dissolitude

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